Honey: The Good Stuff

Despite the fact that the spring this year in Sweden has been very cold, my beekeeping class was able to extract some honey today.
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Admittedly, during this course I’ve been a little worried that I’d be allergic to bees. I’d never been stung before and I have a tendency to be allergic to everything from horses to acai berries. I guess I was kind of hoping to get stung, so I could figure out if I was wasting my time learning beekeeping. My beekeeping professor, Ingmar Fries, does not recommend beekeeping for those allergic to bees.
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I expected I’d get stung while messing around with the hives, so I’d be prepared. In fact, I’d been kind of blase when working with them because I figured I’d need to get stung eventually. But today as I was simply observing, a wayward bee decided to dive-bomb my forehead. The professor quickly got the stinger out, but I was slightly traumatized.
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I didn’t have an allergic reaction, but I still have a headache. But afterwards we extracted some sweet delicious early-spring honey. Unlike store-bought honey, which is typically heat-treated for shelf life, this fresh raw honey was buzzing with aromatic volatile compounds that made eating it a wonderful way to experience spring flowers.
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Here is a nice bee. As a drone, he doesn’t sting. Bonus points for big adorable eyes.

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